latest news from pulmans

Catch up on the latest new from Pulman Steel and the steel industry

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Using the latest computer controlled saws, all of our steel stock can be cut to length whether batch quantities are required or just one off's.

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Comprehensive Stock Range

Comprehensive Stock Range

Our steel stockholding is comprehensive to enable fast turnaround on deliveries when required.

Profiling

Profiling

High quality steel blanks, rings and almost any steel shapes can be plasma cut up to 40mm thick and oxy-propane cut up to 180mm thick.

Sawing

Sawing

Using the latest computer controlled saws, all of our steel stock can be cut to length whether batch quantities are required or just one off's.

Machining

Machining

Using a vertical machining centre, we have the capability to offer a range of expert machining services including drilling, notching, tapping, counter sinking and more.

Delivery

Delivery

Our dedicated transport fleet ensures flexibility to deliver general steels, engineering steels, bright steels, plate, sheet, sectional steel, RHS, CHS and ERW tube when you need it.

latest news from pulmans

1st August 2017

A Wide Range of Steel Machining Capabilities

Dah Lih machine

What’s new at Pulmans? Well we have expanded our steel processing capabilities yet again – this time to include a full range of steel machining services. Along with our existing facilities for steel profiling and sawing, we can now provide services in drilling, tapping, counter-sinking, notching, machining and milling.

The combination of our high definition profiling capabilities and this new Machining Centre allow us to deliver an increased level of complexity with steel profiles, precisely matching customer specified designs and requirements.

This is all made possible with our new Dah Lih Vertical Machining Centre – an elaborate piece of equipment designed for machining steel on a working surface measuring 1020mm by 510mm.

Using 24 different computer-controlled machining tools, our highly skilled operators can also use this versatile machine to cut holes and slots into bespoke lengths of our flat bar, angles, RHS, channels and more, providing they are within the machine’s capabilities.

With the addition of our Machining Centre, Pulmans is now a real one-stop-shop for all your steel needs. Whether you need off-the-shelf, sawn, profiled or machined steel products, we can process and deliver all the steel you need for your project – streamlining your procurement process and saving you valuable time.

15th August 2017

A recipe for steel

Metal

Most people know the two main ingredients of steel – iron and carbon. These are the two ingredients that MUST be present for a material to be considered steel, but the steel we use today is often more complex than that.

The World Steel Association believes there to be over 3,500 different grades of steel being used today, and each one has a different chemical makeup. Steel generally contains a carbon content between 0.002% and 2.1%, and the precise carbon content along with that of other alloying metals can make a big difference in the resulting properties of the metal.

Carbon Steels are by far the most common, and are used for a wide range of applications – particularly in construction. They make up about 90% of steels being produced today, and can contain up to 2.1% carbon (although rarely more than 1%). The lower the carbon content, the more workable the steel is. As the carbon content rises, the steel becomes stronger but also becomes more difficult to form, more difficult to weld and also lowers the melting point.

Alloy steels use a range of different elements to change the properties of the metal. Using elements such as manganese, silicon, nickel, titanium, chromium, copper and aluminium to affect the steel’s hardness, strength, corrosion resistance, weldability, formability and ductility. These steels are normally used for automotive construction, power generation, electric motors and more.

Stainless steels contain around 10-20% chromium, which drastically increases the corrosion resistance. Stainless steels are broken up into three main groups – austenitic, ferritic and martensitic. Austenitic steels contain around 8% nickel, are non-magnetic, heat-treatable and are often used in food production applications. Ferritic steels contain elements such as molybdenum, titanium and aluminium. They can’t be heat-treated, but can be strengthened through cold-working processes. Martensitic steels have a relatively high carbon content of around 1.2%, which makes them suitable for use in knives, cutting tools and surgical equipment.

Tools steels are developed for high durability, heat resistance and durability – which make them perfect for cutting, drilling and other hard wearing applications. They generally contain elements such as vanadium, chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten in varying quantities.

Of course, these are just some of the common types of steel used today, but there are thousands out there, and as the needs of consumers change, new types of steel are developed. Steel is an exceptionally versatile material with seemingly endless uses and capabilities.